Pro Bono Posting: Major Gifts Officer with The One Love Foundation, an Outstanding Nonprofit!

The One Love Foundation is committed to philanthropically funding the development and distribution of its educational tools and initiatives in the interest of sparking a movement to end relationship violence. As such, fundraising is a critical element of their work. They are hoping to hire an experienced fundraiser to identify and engage donors in their mission.  The One Love Foundation’s ideal candidate will be an enthusiastic fundraising professional who believes wholeheartedly in their mission and is eager to identify, cultivate, and solicit individuals capable of making major gifts.

 

This is a unique opportunity for a dedicated, results-oriented, relationship builder to make a significant impact at an innovative nonprofit. One Love is in a phase of rapid growth. The position requires strong entrepreneurial skills to leverage their small donor base and to build new relationships in their focused regions. This is not a traditional major gift officer position, but rather an opportunity to help a relatively new nonprofit grow and deepen in regions across the country.

 

Responsibilities of the job include:

  • Identify, cultivate, solicit, and steward individual and corporate donors at the major gift level ($2,500 – $100,000+).
  • Develop customized strategies to cultivate and solicit donors.
  • Identify new fundraising opportunities that match One Love’s mission and priorities.
  • Work with the Managing Director, Partnerships to establish, develop and implement fundraising goals.
  • Create and develop compelling proposals to donors that effectively make the case for support.
  • Assist in the development of Regional Leadership Councils (Boston, Dallas, New York & San Francisco) and lead efforts to engage and empower these important stakeholders and donors.

 

To Apply:

Send the following to jobs@joinonelove.org

  • Put: “I’m your next Major Gift Officer” in the subject line
  • Include an attached resume in PDF format

 

 

Onboard or Onward: Ensuring the Success of Your New Executive Hire

“About 40% of executives who change jobs or get promoted fail in the first 18 months.”

Fortune Magazine

Where does it all go wrong? Too often, the onboarding process is where things fall apart. I am not talking about “orientation”, which often is done day one and generally involves the basics of assigning a building pass, conducting a benefits overviews, meeting the team and reading a few policies. Onboarding is a longer process, and if done well (typically in partnership with Human Resources and managed by the new executive’s manager, or the Board Chair if they report to the Board of Directors) can almost guarantee fit. It is holistic and gradual. It is also very deliberate, and will require constant check-ins and open communication.  Here are five key activities that will help to ensure that your new executive will be successful in their new role:

Start to Onboard Before They are Actually ON BOARD!

The time between an offer being accepted and the executive starting is sensitive. They may be dealing with a counteroffer, having to say goodbye to much-loved colleagues, and are nervous about this new venture. Keep in touch. Reiterate your excitement to have them joining the team, and have a few people in the organization reach out. If there are organizational overviews, annual reports, strategic plans or other things that that they can read up on ahead of time, get those to them during this time so that they start to feel like part of the team.

Send an announcement out to the staff and the board a few days before their start date explaining their background and the job they are filling. This will help make them seem more familiar to the team when they come through the door, and as an added benefit they will not have to review their resume and background with absolutely everyone in their first week or so.

Relationship Before Task 

Ideally, new executives will meet with their team and people across the organization. One-on-one meetings are great, but remind those who will be meeting with the executive to get to know them before delving into the inner workings of their role or the issues they face. Building rapport with new colleagues and direct reports is critical in the early days.

Learn By Doing 

Too often, in an effort to get all the information to a new hire as soon as possible, they are introduced to processes way too soon. Guess what? They will not remember how to do an expense report or change their password or complete a sales report 30 to 60 days in when they actually need to do it if they are taught how to do it their first week. Have the right people meet with them at the start to review the process at a high level, and then have them set up a time to do it later when they can sit down with real data and learn from it real-time.

The Buddy System 

What we learned in grade school still applies: the buddy system works when the new kid starts. This should not be the executive’s manager, but a peer or high-performing direct report who has longevity and the personality to be an effective buddy. The buddy can manage the nicety of taking them to lunch on day one and being available to explain the intricacies of culture, relationship dynamics, and certain pitfalls to avoid, which are things that the executive may not be comfortable asking of higher-ups.

Check In Early & Often

I too often hear that executives join, get a ton of attention the first day or two, and then are largely left on their own. It does not feel welcoming, and it runs the risk of them going in a direction that is difficult to course-correct later on. Meet with them daily, even for 10-15 minutes, in the first few weeks. Move on to twice weekly, weekly….you get the point. Let them know where they are doing a great job. Let them know where they need to take a different approach. But LET THEM KNOW. Being clear on what is a success will lead to more success.

While by no means a complete onboarding process, following the steps above will help to ensure that your new executive hire is one of the 60% who will be a success in the first 18 months.

Cindy Joyce is an Executive Recruiter and the Founder of Pillar Search, an Executive Search and HR Consulting firm located in Boston that works with clients nationwide. She can be reached here.